Back to Top
Frank Auerbach, Portrait of Leon Kossoff (detail)

Frank Auerbach, Portrait of Leon Kossoff (detail)

Agnes Martin’s last drawing (2004)

Agnes Martin’s last drawing (2004)

Robert Motherwell - The Open series

Fra Angelico fresco at San Marco(photo: Jason Micheli)

Fra Angelico fresco at San Marco
(photo: Jason Micheli)

Kazimir Malevich - Suprematist Composition (1915)

Kazimir Malevich - Suprematist Composition (1915)

by meubzh on Flickr.

by meubzh on Flickr.

(via breathe-in-choruses)

Give Up The Gold Or Give Up Your Life, 1999-Ed Ruscha

Give Up The Gold Or Give Up Your Life, 1999-Ed Ruscha

(via purgingdistance)

Lin Tianmiao, Seeing Shadows

Lin Tianmiao, Seeing Shadows

Caught on CameraMay 1957: Philip GustonPhilip Guston (American, born Canada, 1913–1980) was a friend of Jackson Pollock, who convinced him to move to New York and introduced him to other artists including Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline. Despite his proximity to these artists and their bold, gestural works, Guston’s style became characterized by floating color forms and bright, luminous energy. Voyage, 1956, is an example of this nonobjective trend, in which areas of color cluster toward the middle of the canvas. The artist was influenced by Chinese art and calligraphy, the tenets of Buddhism, and works by Piet Mondrian (Dutch, 1872–1944) in developing this style, one that some critics called “Abstract Impressionism.”Above, the artist stands in front of Voyage at the opening of Contemporary Art—Acquisitions 1954–1957 on May 15, 1957. Voyage, along with works by Pollock, de Kooning, and Kline, are on view now as part of Sincerely Yours: Treasures of the Queen City through September 14, 2014. 
Content adapted from The Long Curve: 150 Years of Visionary Collecting at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (published by Skira/Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 2011). Image by the Towne Studio, Buffalo, and Courtesy Albright-Knox Art Gallery Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Caught on Camera
May 1957: Philip Guston

Philip Guston (American, born Canada, 1913–1980) was a friend of Jackson Pollock, who convinced him to move to New York and introduced him to other artists including Willem de Kooning and Franz Kline. Despite his proximity to these artists and their bold, gestural works, Guston’s style became characterized by floating color forms and bright, luminous energy. Voyage, 1956, is an example of this nonobjective trend, in which areas of color cluster toward the middle of the canvas. The artist was influenced by Chinese art and calligraphy, the tenets of Buddhism, and works by Piet Mondrian (Dutch, 1872–1944) in developing this style, one that some critics called “Abstract Impressionism.”

Above, the artist stands in front of Voyage at the opening of Contemporary Art—Acquisitions 1954–1957 on May 15, 1957. Voyage, along with works by Pollock, de Kooning, and Kline, are on view now as part of Sincerely Yours: Treasures of the Queen City through September 14, 2014.

Content adapted from The Long Curve: 150 Years of Visionary Collecting at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery (published by Skira/Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 2011). Image by the Towne Studio, Buffalo, and Courtesy Albright-Knox Art Gallery Archives, Buffalo, New York. © 2014 Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Janet Malcolm, from The Emily Dickinson Series, collage

Janet Malcolm, from The Emily Dickinson Series, collage

Jr Goodwin, Cloud

Jr Goodwin, Cloud

(via purgingdistance)

Geogia O’Keeffe on evening walk with her dogs, Ghost Ranch, 1966 -  by John Loengard

Geogia O’Keeffe on evening walk with her dogs, Ghost Ranch, 1966 -  by John Loengard

Philip Guston, untitled, 1964gouache on paper, 75.6 x 100.3 cmMcKee Gallery

Philip Guston, untitled, 1964
gouache on paper, 75.6 x 100.3 cm
McKee Gallery

Brandon Francis Wilson, from the series You Gotta Be Lucky

Brandon Francis Wilson, from the series You Gotta Be Lucky

THEME BY PARTI